Diabetes

Extremely low-calorie diet found to reverse Type 2 diabetes in study

13 Nov 2017 --- A very low-calorie diet can rapidly reverse Type 2 diabetes in animal models, suggests a new study from a Yale-led research team in the US. If confirmed in people, the insight provides potential new drug targets for treating the common chronic disease, note the researchers, whose study is published in Cell Metabolism.

Diabetes prevention and management under industry spotlight ahead of World Diabetes Day 2017

13 Nov 2017 --- World Diabetes Day falls tomorrow on November 14, and this year’s edition spotlights women with the disease and their “right to a healthy future.” Companies and organizations including Nestlé and the International Sweeteners Association (ISA) are marking the day by contributing to the fight against obesity and standing with women with diabetes as they try to manage the condition effectively.

Wholesome: Large-scale study underpins the health benefits of whole grains

03 Nov 2017 --- Exchanging refined grain products – such as white bread and pasta – with whole grain varieties causes overweight adults to eat less, lose weight, leading to a decrease in the amount of inflammation in their bodies. These are some of the findings of Danish study headed by the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. The study supports the scientific basis for the dietary recommendations of many countries to choose whole grains.

Plant-derived berberine could slow diabetes-related decline, research suggests

02 Nov 2017 --- Researchers studying the natural, plant-derived compound berberine have linked its anti-inflammatory activity and ability to regulate levels of stress-response proteins including sirtuin to berberine’s positive effects on memory loss and impaired learning. In addition to improving diabetic encephalopathy and slowing central nervous system degeneration, berberine was also associated with better lipid metabolism and decreased fasting glucose in aging diabetic mice.

Omega 6 rich diet linked to significantly reduced Type 2 diabetes risk

12 Oct 2017 --- The risk of developing Type 2 diabetes could be significantly reduced by eating a diet rich in omega 6 polyunsaturated fats, a new study suggests. These findings, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, shed new light on the potential health benefits of omega 6, which is found in bean and seed oils such as soybean and sunflower oils and in nuts. They also support clinical recommendations to increase dietary intake of omega 6 rich foods.

Gut microbiota’s activation of MAIT lymphocytes could hold key to Type 1 diabetes prevention

10 Oct 2017 --- The onset of Type 1 diabetes is preceded by modification of MAIT lymphocytes, which are activated by intestinal flora, according to scientists from the Cochin Institute (CNRS/INSERM/Paris Descartes University) and their colleagues from AP-HP Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital in Paris. The MAIT lymphocyte cells – associated with mucosae and able to recognize elements of the microbiota – could, therefore, serve as new biomarkers for early detection and prevention of the illness. The researchers' findings are published in Nature Immunology.

DuPont soybean oil causes less obesity and insulin resistance, but may harm liver: study

06 Oct 2017 --- Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have found that while a genetically-modified (GM) soybean oil used in many restaurants induces less obesity and insulin resistance than conventional soybean oil, its effects on diabetes and fatty liver are similar to those of conventional soybean oil.

CK Nutraceuticals partners with Kunpoong to distribute chitosan oligosaccharide

28 Sep 2017 --- South Korea’s Kunpoong Bio Co. Ltd., a global operator in the chitosan oligosaccharide market, has appointed Toronto-based CK Nutraceuticals (CK) as its exclusive North America sales, marketing and distribution partner for its Go2Ka1 ingredient (branded as KitoMax in North America).

Fat-regulating enzyme could hold key to preventing cancer, diabetes and other diseases

18 Sep 2017 --- Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick in the US have found that getting rid of the enzyme known as phosphatidic acid phosphatase can increase the risk of cancer, diabetes, inflammation and other medical issues. Their findings were published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry last month.

Artificial sweeteners linked to increased diabetes risk, ISA refutes small scale study

15 Sep 2017 --- New research presented this week at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Lisbon, Portugal, has suggested that consuming large amounts of artificial sweeteners may increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. In response, the International Sweeteners Association (ISA) has issued a strongly-worded statement on the research saying that it “would like to draw attention to the overwhelming body of evidence, including from studies by the same Australian research team, showing that low-calorie sweeteners do not affect glucose control.”

 

Blood biomarkers prove pivotal role of food for diabetes risk

14 Sep 2017 --- Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have found that several diet and nutrient biomarkers – molecules that can be measured in blood that are related to diet – are linked with both risk to have Type 2 diabetes and future risk of developing diabetes.

 

Biochemists dip into the anti-diabetic benefits of olives and olive oil

13 Sep 2017 --- A research team at Virginia Tech university in the US has discovered that the olive-derived compound oleuropein helps the body secrete more insulin, the central signaling molecule in the body that controls metabolism. The same compound also detoxifies the signaling molecule amylin that over-produces and forms harmful aggregates in Type 2 diabetes, according to the study. In these two distinct ways, oleuropein has been found to help prevent the onset of disease.

Substance found in coffee could help to delay onset of Type 2 diabetes

08 Sep 2017 --- Scientists have reported that a previously untested compound in coffee seems to improve cell function and insulin sensitivity in laboratory mice. The findings, which appear in a study in the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Journal of Natural Products, could spur the development of new drugs to treat or even prevent Type 2 diabetes. In recent years, researchers have identified substances in coffee that could help to deal with the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease that nearly 30 million Americans suffer from. But few of these have been tested in animals.

Natural compounds in cocoa could delay onset of type 2 diabetes

30 Aug 2017 --- There is a possibility that eating some kinds of chocolate could help to fight and treat diabetes, as certain compounds found in cocoa called epicatechin monomers can actually help the body release more insulin and respond to increased blood glucose better. This is according to research at Brigham Young University (BYU) in the US that was funded, in part, thanks to grants from the Diabetes Action Research and Education Foundation and the American Diabetes Association.

Diabetes UK: Alcohol study not a “green light”

31 Jul 2017 --- A recent study in which researchers from Denmark suggest that drinking moderately three or four times a week may reduce the risk of diabetes shouldn’t be taken as a “green light” to drink to excess due to the “complex” nature of the disease, according to a Diabetes UK response.

Broccoli Contains Powerful Antidiabetic Substance

19 Jun 2017 --- Research from the University of Gothenburg has identified an antioxidant – richly occurring in broccoli – as a new antidiabetic substance. The patient study shows significantly lower blood sugar levels in participants who ate broccoli extract with high levels of sulforaphane.

Vitamin A Found to Improve Function of Insulin Producing Beta Cells

14 Jun 2017 --- A new study has suggested that vitamin A improves the insulin producing β-cell´s function, for the first time pointing to a key role for vitamin A in the way the body copes with diabetes. The researchers initially discovered that insulin-producing beta-cells contain a large quantity of a cell surface receptor for vitamin A. The researchers believe that the purpose, in this particular case, is that vitamin A plays an important role for the development of beta-cells in the early stages of life, but also for a proper function during the remaining life especially during pathophysiological conditions, i.e some inflammatory conditions.

Special Report: New Ways to Cope with Diabetes

12 Jun 2017 --- Affecting approximately 380 million people worldwide, diabetes is a leading cause of range of ailments, including kidney failure, amputations, cardiovascular diseases and stroke. According to the Diabetes Research Institute, diabetes takes more lives on a yearly basis than AIDS and breast cancer combined. NutritionInsight looks at some of the most recent diabetes-related research and some of the novel approaches and solutions to tackling this condition.

Pregnancy Diet High in Refined Grains May Increase Risk of Childhood Obesity: NIH

09 Jun 2017 --- Children born to women with gestational diabetes whose diet included high proportions of refined grains may have a higher risk of obesity by age 7, compared to children born to women with gestational diabetes who ate low proportions of refined grains, according to results of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study. These findings, which appear online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, were part of the Diabetes & Women's Health Study, a research project led by NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

India’s Diabetes Epidemic Shifts to Poorer People in More Affluent Cities

08 Jun 2017 --- India’s diabetes epidemic is shifting, with the disease now increasingly common among people from low socio-economic backgrounds living in urban areas of the more affluent states, according to a study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. The authors say the findings should cause concern in a country where most treatment costs are paid out-of-pocket by patients, and highlight the urgent need for effective prevention measures. 

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